How to acclimate livestock

 

For Fish



1. Turn off all aquarium lights for 3-4 hours. This gives all new arrivals a chance to rest without being harassed, and avoids the water in the bag overheating.

2. Float the bag with the new fish in the aquarium for 15-20 minutes to equalize the water temperature in the bag with the water temperature in the aquarium.

3. After 15-20 minutes cut open the top of the plastic bag with the new fish and roll down the top of the bag about an inch to create an air pocket within the lip of the bag. If able, use a peg to keep the bag in place.

4. Continue to float the bag in the aquarium.

5. Pour a cup of aquarium water into the bag every five minutes until the bag is nearly full.

6. Remove the bag from the aquarium and discard half of the water from the bag. (Be careful that you do not discard your fish!) Do not pour the water from the bag into the aquarium!

7. Again float the bag in the aquarium and add one cup of aquarium water every 5 minutes until the bag is nearly full again.

8. Net the fish carefully from the bag and release it into the aquarium.


For Coral & Invertebrates

1. Float the bag in the aquarium for 15-20 minutes to equalize the water temperature.

2. For sponges, clams, scallops, and gorgonians:
These items should never be exposed to air.
Open the shipping bag underwater and remove the specimen from the bag underwater. After you remove the item twist the shipping bag closed underwater and discard the shipping bag and all of the water in it.


A small amount of shipping water will escape into the aquarium this way, but our shipping water is reef safe and will not harm your aquarium. This method will help to insure the success of these specimens in your aquarium. Then follow steps 8 through 9.

For all other corals and invertebrates: Remove the bag from the aquarium and cut open the top of the bag. Then follow steps 3 through 9.

3. Pour one cup of aquarium water into the bag every 5 minutes until the bag is nearly full.

4. Discard half of the water from the bag. Do not pour the water from the bag into the aquarium!

5. Add one cup of aquarium water every 5 minutes until the bag is nearly full again.

6. Remove the coral or invertebrate from the shipping bag and place it into the aquarium.

7. When placing corals in the aquarium think about the lighting conditions and the water flow in the area you plan to place them. You might want to refer to the page from our website for that particular coral to find out about its lighting and flow requirements.

8. After you have placed the coral into position wave your hand at it to create a strong current. If the coral stays put you are done. If the coral falls or moves try to wedge it in more securely. If the coral is secure then you dont have to worry so much about fish knocking it over.

9. Please note that many species of coral may take
up to five days to fully open and acclimate to your aquarium.
If they remain closed for more than a week try moving them to a different position with different lighting and flow conditions.

Reef-keeping success tips

 

Always use DI filtered RO water

Always cycle your tank with cured live rock.

Use a protein skimmer & live rock as the heart
of your filtration.

Always use iron-based phosphate remover.

Keep your fish plump.

Use nassarius snails and/or sand sifting starfish to
clean your sand. Or stir your sand weekly.

Do your research and ask about livestock behaviour. For corals, be sure you have the right lighting, water flow, and water parameters. For fish, be sure it's compatible with other tankmates and you have the right size tank and food.

Test your water parameters weekly and keep a record.

Do a 10-15% water change every two weeks.

Create drip loops with your power cords. Elevate power source so if water drips down cord, it won't cause a fire.

Do be patient while your tank cycles.

Do change bulbs regularly on reef tanks. Most bulbs last 10-12 months.

Do research the right type of system for your needs. (lights, filtration, tank size, equipment).

Don't cycle your tank with damsels. Damsels are mean and aggressive. They will limit what you can add to your tank later.

Don't use tap water.

Don't overfeed! It can lead to high nitrates, phosphates and bad algae.

Don't let phosphates turn your corals brown and cause ugly algae growth.

Don't stir your sand if you've never stirred it. You could be releasing deadly toxins.

Don't use canister filters as main filtration. This is freshwater technology!

Don't buy on impulse because something looks cool. Always research.

Don't buy on impulse. You will waste money re-buying the right equipment or on dead livestock.